News

Fictional anchor Ron Burgundy becomes Chrysler pitchman

Fictional anchor Ron Burgundy becomes Chrysler pitchman

I'M RON BURGANDY: Will Ferrell will try to help Chrysler sell cars. Photo: Associated Press

AUBURN HILLS, Mich. (AP) — When you’ve got the smallest marketing budget of the Detroit Three automakers, you have to take risks to get your TV spots noticed.

That’s why Olivier Francois, the marketing chief for Chrysler, gambles a lot.

He’s following successful ads featuring rapper Eminem and movie star Clint Eastwood with a pitch from a fictitious character — egotistical airhead television anchorman Ron Burgundy from the 2004 movie “Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy.”

And this time, Francois got the talent to pitch a refurbished version of the Dodge Durango SUV for free.

He said that Paramount Pictures bartered work on the commercials by Will Ferrell, who plays Burgundy, in exchange for the promotion in the ads of an “Anchorman” sequel that is due out in December.

What's On 'KLH?

Vote for BEER in ’16!

hometownbrew_int_wp2REV

Pick up a 6-pack of our limited edition WKLH / Sprecher Hometown Brew 30th Anniversary Lager at these fine locations…

Hire Me MKE

HireMeMKE_620x400

Looking for a job around the Milwaukee area? Check out some opening…

Wanna Play DJ?

HEYMOM

You can host your own show Sunday night at 6 on ‘KLH!

Recent Headlines

9 hours ago in Entertainment

REVIEW: ‘How To Be Single’ feels the same while trying too hard to be different

22-overlay-9

"How to Be Single" makes a valiant attempt to send up rom-com clichés but it borrows so much from other, better movies that you start to wonder if the film’s title should be "How to Commit Larceny."

10 hours ago in Music

Springsteen promises to show his mind in autobiography

springsteen

Springsteen, 66, has been working on the autobiography, called "Born to Run," for seven years.

10 hours ago in National

Wall Street tumbles

stocks

Wall Street was off more than 1 percent on Thursday, pushing the S&P 500 and the Dow Jones industrial average down 10 percent for the year, as investors jettisoned stocks and scurried toward safer shores.